Considering Causes for Hypoactive Delirium

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Australasian Journal of Neuroscience

Australian Association of Neuroscience Nursing

Subject: Nursing

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ISSN: 1032-335X
eISSN: 2208-6781

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Volume 29 (2019)
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VOLUME 29 , ISSUE 1 (Mar 2019) > List of articles

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Considering Causes for Hypoactive Delirium

Malissa A Mulkey * / Sonya R Hardin / DaiWai M Olson / Cindy L Munro / Erik Everhart

Citation Information : Australasian Journal of Neuroscience. Volume 29, Issue 1, Pages 9-16, DOI: https://doi.org/10.21307/ajon-2017-015

License : (CC-BY-NC-ND 4.0)

Published Online: 18-March-2019

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ABSTRACT

Delirium is defined as a mental disorder characterized by an abnormal state of cognition and awareness. Delirium is associated with an annual cost of $350 billion between the United States and Europe. Approximately 80% of delirium cases are either not identified or misdiagnosed. Older adults have the highest incidence due to the consequences of aging. Hypoactive delirium or “quite delirium” is the most common delirium subtype experienced by older adults.

Hypoactive delirium, is difficult to recognize and has worse outcomes than other subtypes. If detected, symptoms of hypoactive delirium are frequently dismissed as depression or dementia. Therefore, nurses need heightened vigilance in assessment and identification of hypoactive delirium. This article seeks to assist nurses in identifying hypoactive delirium by outlining factors that increase an individual’s potential for developing hypoactive delirium.

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