Translating theory into practice: One school’s approach to identifying Māori gifted and talented learners

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VOLUME 19 , ISSUE 1 (July 2015) > List of articles

Translating theory into practice: One school’s approach to identifying Māori gifted and talented learners

Emma Scobie-Jennings

Citation Information : Apex. VOLUME 19 , ISSUE 1 , ISSN (Online) 2324-1284, DOI: 10.21307/apex-2015-009, July 2015 © 2018.

License : (CC-BY-NC-ND-4.0)

Published Online: 06-July-2018

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Figure 1.

The interrelationships between concept, characteristics, identification, programmes and self-review1

REFERENCES

  1. Bevan-Brown, J. (1993). Special abilities: A Māori perspective. Wellington, New Zealand: He Parekereke, Department of Education, Victoria University of Wellington.
  2. Bevan-Brown, J. (2000). Running the gauntlet: A gifted Māori learner’s journey through secondary school. Proceedings of the Now is the future, the gifted student in today’s secondary school conference. Auckland, New Zealand: George Parkyn Centre.
  3. Bevan-Brown, J. (2005a). Gifted and talented Māori learners. In D. McAlpine, & R. Moltzen (Eds.), Gifted and talented: New Zealand perspectives (2 ed., pp. 171-198). Wellington, New Zealand: Kanuka Grove Press.
  4. Bevan-Brown, J. (2005b). Providing a culturally responsive environment for gifted Māori learners. International Education Journal, 6(2), 150-155.
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  6. Bevan-Brown, J. (2010). Components of a Māori concept of giftedness. In A. Macfarlane (Ed.), Above the clouds: Ka rewa ake ki ngā kapua. A collection of readings for identifying and nurturing Māori students of promise (pp. 165-167). Christchurch: Te Waipounamu Focus Group.
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  8. Biddick, M. (2009). Cluster grouping for the gifted and talented: It works! Apex: The New Zealand Journal of Gifted Education, 15(4), 78-86. Retrieved 20 November 2014 from http://www.giftedchildren.org.nz/apex/.
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  11. Briggs, C. J., Reis, S. M., & Sullivan, E. E. (2008). A national view of promising programs and practices for culturally, linguistically, and ethnically diverse gifted and talented students. Gifted Child Quarterly, 52(2), 131-145.
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  12. Cathcart, R. (2005). They’re not bringing my brain out: Understanding and working with gifted and talented learners. Auckland, New Zealand: Hatchette Livre NZ Ltd.
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  22. Macfarlane, A. H., Christensen, J., Comerford, C., Martin, J., & York, S. (2010). Preface. In A. Macfarlane, Above the clouds, Ka rewa ake ki ngā kapua: Identifying and nurturing Māori students of promise (pp. iii-vii). Christchurch, New Zealand: Te Waipounamu Focus Group.
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  27. McKenzie, J. A. (2004). The influence of identification practices, race and SES on the identification of gifted students. In J. S. Renzulli (Ed.), Identification of students for gifted and talented programs (pp. 131-136). Thousand Oaks, California: Corwin Press.
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  33. Riley, T., & Bicknell, B. (2013). Gifted and talented education in New Zealand Schools: A Decade Later. APEX: The New Zealand Journal of Gifted Education, 18(1). Retrieved 20 November 2014 from www.giftedchildren.org.nz/apex.
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  34. Scobie-Jennings, E. (2013a). An investigation into the identification of Māori gifted and talented students in mainstream schools. Apex: The New Zealand Journal of Gifted Education, 18(1). Retrieved 18 October 2014 from www.giftedchildren.org.nz/apex/v18no1.php
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  35. Scobie-Jennings, E. (2013b). Gifted and talented education at Bream Bay College. Retrieved from https://sites.google.com/a/breambaycollege.school.nz/gifted-and-talented-education-at-bbc/
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  37. Strong Scott, M., Stoyko Deuel, L.-L., Jean-Francois, B., & Urbano, R. C. (2004). Identifying cognitively gifted ethnic minority children. In A. Y. Baldwin (Ed.), Culturally diverse and underserved populations of gifted students (pp. 35-48). Thousand Oaks, California: Corwin Press.
  38. Webber, M. (2011). Gifted and proud: On being exceptional and Māori. In P. Whitinui (Ed.), Kia tangi te tītī: Permission to speak (pp. 227-241). Wellington, New Zealand: NZCER Press.
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